Play it Good and Right

We Get Questions!   Patrick, 28.
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raptorific:

so much happening here:
Feels a lot like you’re saying all of those things are supposed to be synonyms for “crazy” and “insane,” which is honestly more hurtful to me as a mentally ill person than being called “crazy” or “insane.”
Thanks for starring out the letter A there. If I see those words entirely intact, I’ll probably spin into a manic rage and poop on the floor like a wild animal! Thanks for removing literally one letter so I only have to see 85% of the word, now I don’t have to start foaming at the mouth!
The words “crazy” and “insane” are actually really important words for a lot of mentally ill people, who use it as a necessary shorthand to express concern that our illnesses might be skewing our perceptions of reality. For example, “is it crazy that I’m so worried about this?” is a much more effective thing to say than “is this a legitimate concern, or am I just projecting my own anxieties and paranoia onto the world around me?” Treating “crazy” as an inherently hurtful slur in all contexts (even “just saying it with no context so people know which word you’re talking about” as above) takes away a “real or not real” shorthand from us. 
Seriously this kind of post is so patronizing people stop doing them

raptorific:

so much happening here:

  1. Feels a lot like you’re saying all of those things are supposed to be synonyms for “crazy” and “insane,” which is honestly more hurtful to me as a mentally ill person than being called “crazy” or “insane.”
  2. Thanks for starring out the letter A there. If I see those words entirely intact, I’ll probably spin into a manic rage and poop on the floor like a wild animal! Thanks for removing literally one letter so I only have to see 85% of the word, now I don’t have to start foaming at the mouth!
  3. The words “crazy” and “insane” are actually really important words for a lot of mentally ill people, who use it as a necessary shorthand to express concern that our illnesses might be skewing our perceptions of reality. For example, “is it crazy that I’m so worried about this?” is a much more effective thing to say than “is this a legitimate concern, or am I just projecting my own anxieties and paranoia onto the world around me?” Treating “crazy” as an inherently hurtful slur in all contexts (even “just saying it with no context so people know which word you’re talking about” as above) takes away a “real or not real” shorthand from us. 
  4. Seriously this kind of post is so patronizing people stop doing them
— 2 weeks ago with 11242 notes
"You realize you are not alone, right? No one in their twenties has life figured out. It’s okay to be a mess. You’re living."

Things my therapist told me today that almost made me burst out into tears. I need to remember this more often. (via h-auptgewinn)

this

(via zimtsahne)

Just reading this made me all full of the emotions, and then I scrolled down and I’d already liked it.

(Source: loveandtomfoolery, via alltheloststars)

— 1 month ago with 405899 notes

dangercupcakemurdericing:

Sometimes I’m internally like “How is that a trigger?, ” then I realize other people have different life experiences from me, they don’t owe me their story, and I move the fuck on.

(via timetravelingimpala)

— 1 month ago with 60026 notes
plasmalogical:

mysteryho:

it just gets worse


old_man_yells_at_cloud.jpg

plasmalogical:

mysteryho:

it just gets worse

image

old_man_yells_at_cloud.jpg

(via callmejude)

— 1 month ago with 29137 notes
the-dream-operator:

coolator:

This is something I have not been talking about on my blog very much because it’s been so detrimental to my mental health for such a long time that I am only now ready to speak up.
I have worked for Canada Post for four years. I have been bullied and talked down to by the majority of my coworkers, most of whom are decades older than myself. Towards the second half of 2013, I had begun to experience worsening levels of anxiety and depression. Soon, I was experiencing debilitating panic attacks at work, and I found myself often hiding and in the washroom crying and trying to catch my breath. One day, my boss called me into her office to discuss something random. She went off on a lengthy homophobic rant about how disgusting she thought it was to see two men holding hands in public. I was in the closet at the time, so I tried to keep my composure and remain calm, but I left work that day feeling worse than ever. 
The next week, I called in sick. I called in every day because I couldn’t sleep at night and the anxiety I was feeling daily was enough to make me physically ill. A few days later, police woke me up after they broken down my back door. They were accompanied by my mother, who had received a phone call at work from my boss saying I was suicidal or had attempted suicide. My mom was hysterical. I was furious.
When I confronted my manager, she exclaimed that she had received n tip saying I was suicidal and wanted to check on me. She refused to tell me anything more until I was “healthy.”
Not long after, I went on short term disability. After a couple months, I was told my case was being forwarded to another agent who would be handling my appeal. The agent told me the appeal was to extend my coverage and that I had nothing to worry about while it was happening because I would continue to be paid.
When I was instructed to have medical forms filled out for the insurance company, I was bounced back and forth from doctor to doctor to psychiatrist to doctor before I finally met someone who could do it.
Little did I know, the doctor who gave the insurance company my medical record (about prescriptions and continued support for medical leave) had also given them my confidential mental health worker’s notes. 
A month later I received a letter in the mail saying my appeal had been denied on the basis that there was not sufficient medical records to show I was experiencing symptoms of depression, anxiety, and struggling with my sexual identity.
Despite being on prescription medication, in weekly group and solo therapy, and having doctor’s approval to be off work, the appeal was denied due to the fact that I was not straight.
The second appeal was also denied, and the 10 page report includes lines like "[Rhyse] has issues by bisexuality" "experiencing percieved hostility in the workplace" and “[he] has developed situation anxiety at work”  The report completely invalidates any actual harassment I had experienced at work, and then goes on to use that as an explanation for why I have been experiencing anxiety. 
The report includes no less than 7 completely irrelevant references to my sexuality and frames them as an excuse to invalidate the very real and dangerous mental health issues I have struggled with for the past year. Keep in mind that all of this information was collected illegally without my consent. Because the appeal was denied, I am expected to repay Canada Post $8990.40 CDN and up to $2000 in back taxes. 
I am meeting with a lawyer on Tuesday, September 2nd, for a consultation that I am paying out of my own pocket, but if I am to continue seeking damages from the hospital that released my information, my employer, and my insurance company, I will need to be able to pay the retainer fee which is expected to be in the low thousands. 
I know this is a lot to ask of you, but I have been caught in the middle of a war with my mental health and my employer for over a year and taking legal action is the only way to put this to rest and allow me to continue on my road to recovery. Every penny, like, and reblog helps. Thank you so much.
Here’s the link

News flash: queer sick people are still sick people. If you have a patient with a broken leg, are you going to insist he’s fine because he happens to be queer?

the-dream-operator:

coolator:

This is something I have not been talking about on my blog very much because it’s been so detrimental to my mental health for such a long time that I am only now ready to speak up.

I have worked for Canada Post for four years. I have been bullied and talked down to by the majority of my coworkers, most of whom are decades older than myself. Towards the second half of 2013, I had begun to experience worsening levels of anxiety and depression. Soon, I was experiencing debilitating panic attacks at work, and I found myself often hiding and in the washroom crying and trying to catch my breath. One day, my boss called me into her office to discuss something random. She went off on a lengthy homophobic rant about how disgusting she thought it was to see two men holding hands in public. I was in the closet at the time, so I tried to keep my composure and remain calm, but I left work that day feeling worse than ever. 

The next week, I called in sick. I called in every day because I couldn’t sleep at night and the anxiety I was feeling daily was enough to make me physically ill. A few days later, police woke me up after they broken down my back door. They were accompanied by my mother, who had received a phone call at work from my boss saying I was suicidal or had attempted suicide. My mom was hysterical. I was furious.

When I confronted my manager, she exclaimed that she had received n tip saying I was suicidal and wanted to check on me. She refused to tell me anything more until I was “healthy.”

Not long after, I went on short term disability. After a couple months, I was told my case was being forwarded to another agent who would be handling my appeal. The agent told me the appeal was to extend my coverage and that I had nothing to worry about while it was happening because I would continue to be paid.

When I was instructed to have medical forms filled out for the insurance company, I was bounced back and forth from doctor to doctor to psychiatrist to doctor before I finally met someone who could do it.

Little did I know, the doctor who gave the insurance company my medical record (about prescriptions and continued support for medical leave) had also given them my confidential mental health worker’s notes. 

A month later I received a letter in the mail saying my appeal had been denied on the basis that there was not sufficient medical records to show I was experiencing symptoms of depression, anxiety, and struggling with my sexual identity.

Despite being on prescription medication, in weekly group and solo therapy, and having doctor’s approval to be off work, the appeal was denied due to the fact that I was not straight.

The second appeal was also denied, and the 10 page report includes lines like "[Rhyse] has issues by bisexuality" "experiencing percieved hostility in the workplace" and[he] has developed situation anxiety at work  The report completely invalidates any actual harassment I had experienced at work, and then goes on to use that as an explanation for why I have been experiencing anxiety. 

The report includes no less than 7 completely irrelevant references to my sexuality and frames them as an excuse to invalidate the very real and dangerous mental health issues I have struggled with for the past year. Keep in mind that all of this information was collected illegally without my consent. Because the appeal was denied, I am expected to repay Canada Post $8990.40 CDN and up to $2000 in back taxes. 

I am meeting with a lawyer on Tuesday, September 2nd, for a consultation that I am paying out of my own pocket, but if I am to continue seeking damages from the hospital that released my information, my employer, and my insurance company, I will need to be able to pay the retainer fee which is expected to be in the low thousands. 

I know this is a lot to ask of you, but I have been caught in the middle of a war with my mental health and my employer for over a year and taking legal action is the only way to put this to rest and allow me to continue on my road to recovery. Every penny, like, and reblog helps. Thank you so much.

Here’s the link

News flash: queer sick people are still sick people. If you have a patient with a broken leg, are you going to insist he’s fine because he happens to be queer?

(Source: aurevoir-mes-amis, via ghosturtlerika)

— 1 month ago with 5739 notes
#anxiety  #depression  #harassment  #lgbtq 

pyroviles:

also the obvious symbolism when the doctor said “you can’t even remember where you got that face from” was laughable. you’re being too obvious Moffat.

— 1 month ago with 7 notes
#doctor who  #doctor who spoilers  #moffat hate 

fascinates:

people who make you feel better about yourself when you’re sad are so important 

There person I reblogged this from has Bucky as the Winter Soldier as their icon, and it seems so appropriate and sad.

(via jumpingkiss-deactivated20141007)

— 2 months ago with 283315 notes
#captain america tws  #the winter soldier  #bucky barnes 
An Idea

seekinguncertainty:

My church celebrates the Eucharist on the first Sunday of each month.

We also have a food collection the first Sunday of each month.

Seeing as how the early church conceived of Eucharist as a justice moment that fed the poor in the community, perhaps having people bring their donations forward to a basket as they come forward for communion would make that connection, bring justice back to the Eucharist, and encourage more donations, since the donation would be part of the ritual and not just something to put in a box in the Narthex on your way into church.

In fact, I think I might email my minister about this.

I really like this idea, like lots.

— 3 months ago with 3 notes
#church  #communion  #eucharist 

For some reason I thought searching the United Church of Christ tag would be a good idea. Now I’m crying, so… oops.

— 3 months ago with 2 notes
#ucc  #united church of christ